Trans-Siberian Railway (Summer)

The Trans-Siberian Train also known as “The Vodka Train”.

Enjoy an unforgetable trip with the Trans-Sib-Train along one of the longest railways of the world, following the footprints of Alexander von Humboldt.
Approx. 20-day trip from Moscow to Beijing on the Trans-Siberian Railway. Starting with 2 days in Moscow visiting Red Square, the Kremlin, GUM and a lot of other scenic and historic places in Moscow. First stop with the Trans-Siberian-Train will be in Kazan, with a beautiful Kremlin of its own, and Yekaterinenburg, which has a few days of relaxation and summer activities on Olikon Island in Lake Baikal.

Enjoying the typical Russian sauna (Banya) hiking or mountain biking, plus a few days in Mongolia’s capital, Ulaanbaatar, and it’s breathtaking surrounding countryside, as well as few days among the temples and markets in Beijing.
Train accommodations in 1st and 2nd class compartments plus accommodations in 4-5 star hotels (several times) breakfast included, in romantic and comfortable wooden cabins on Olkhon Island (included breakfast, partly full board).
City tours, tour buses or vans, transfer costs.
Trip organization and translations: English/German/Russian
Price starts with EUR 4,900.
Group: Maximum of 10 people + trip organizer and translator.

Included Services:

  • Transsiberian-Train in first and second class compartments (2- and 4-bed-compartment) in Russian standard wagons of the Trans-siberian Railway.
  • Accomodations in rooms with double-bed according to the tour description hotels, hostels and typical wooden huts
  • Breakfast, lunch and dinner acording to the tour description
  • All transfers and excursions, entrance fees are not included
  • Tour Guide/Translator, English guided trip with a mother tongue Russian guide
  • Trip-price-Insurance (Sicherungsschein)

Not included:

  • Visa Service (additional fees, can be organized by SMS Frankfurt)
  • Consul fees
  • Flights
  • Health-Insurance, required
  • Personnel Incurance

Departure mid June from Moscow, Russia.

Optional we create your individual train trip along the Transsiberian Railroad even longer or shorter. Just send us your details and we create your tailormade Russian Train Adventure, one of the last Bucketlist Trips.

Your Request

Make a tour request here or call us +49-69-95 90 97 00!!!

Facts about the Trans-Siberian Railway
The Trans-Siberian Railway (TSR, Russian: Транссиби́рская магистра́ль, tr. Transsibirskaya Magistral; IPA: [trənsʲsʲɪˈbʲirskəjə məgʲɪˈstralʲ]) is a network of railways connecting Moscow with the Russian Far East. With a length of 9,289 kilometres (5,772 miles), it is the longest railway line in the world. There are connecting branch lines into Mongolia, China and North Korea. It has connected Moscow with Vladivostok since 1916, and is still being expanded.

It was built between 1891 and 1916 under the supervision of Russian government ministers personally appointed by Tsar Alexander III and his son, the Tsarevich Nicholas (later Tsar Nicholas II). Even before it had been completed, it attracted travellers who wrote of their adventures.

The railway is often associated with the main transcontinental Russian line that connects hundreds of large and small cities of the European and Asian parts of Russia. At a Moscow-Vladivostok track length of 9,289 kilometres (5,772 miles), it spans a record eight time zones. Taking eight days to complete the journey, it is the third-longest single continuous service in the world, after the Moscow–Pyongyang 10,267 kilometres (6,380 mi) and the Kiev–Vladivostok 11,085 kilometres (6,888 mi) services, both of which also follow the Trans-Siberian for much of their routes.

The main route of the Trans-Siberian Railway begins in Moscow at Yaroslavsky Vokzal, runs through Yaroslavl, Chelyabinsk, Omsk, Novosibirsk, Irkutsk, Krasnoyarsk, Ulan-Ude, Chita, and Khabarovsk to Vladivostok via southern Siberia. A second primary route is the Trans-Manchurian, which coincides with the Trans-Siberian east of Chita as far as Tarskaya (a stop 12 km (7 mi) east of Karymskoye, in Chita Oblast), about 1,000 km (621 mi) east of Lake Baikal. From Tarskaya the Trans-Manchurian heads southeast, via Harbin and Mudanjiang in China’s Northeastern Provinces (from where a connection to Beijing is used by one of the Moscow–Beijing trains), joining with the main route in Ussuriysk just north of Vladivostok. This is the shortest and the oldest railway route to Vladivostok. While there are currently no traverse passenger services (enter China from one side and then exit China and return to Russia on the other side) on this branch, it is still used by several international passenger services between Russia and China.

The third primary route is the Trans-Mongolian Railway, which coincides with the Trans-Siberian as far as Ulan-Ude on Lake Baikal’s eastern shore. From Ulan-Ude the Trans-Mongolian heads south to Ulaan-Baatar before making its way southeast to Beijing. In 1991, a fourth route running further to the north was finally completed, after more than five decades of sporadic work. Known as the Baikal Amur Mainline (BAM), this recent extension departs from the Trans-Siberian line at Taishet several hundred miles west of Lake Baikal and passes the lake at its northernmost extremity. It crosses the Amur River at Komsomolsk-na-Amure (north of Khabarovsk), and reaches the Tatar Strait at Sovetskaya Gavan. On 13 October 2011, a train from Khasan made its inaugural run to Rajin, North Korea.